Posts Tagged as: translation writing communication

Simple Rule #6: If you write flabby copy, even the nicest vendor will gladly mail you a bill for localization that will astound you.

I have said this so many times before: When it comes to localization, keep your content short and sweet. Mainly short. The sweet part is up to you. Why? Because flabby content is expensive to translate. Let’s review the way you pay for translation. Translation companies charged by the word/by the language. For example, you […]

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Blog · Global Readiness · August 12, 2011

Why Can’t We Be Friends?

It’s been a few years now that I’ve been dabbling in the wild and wacky world of localization. I really like the people I’ve met. Most are smart and passionate about what they do. They care deeply about accuracy, readability, ¬†and quality. They care about translation costs and keeping them as reasonable as possible. And […]

Developing Content as Part of the Ecosystem

Once you have thought about how you are going to organize your content, it is time to turn your attention to creating the content. As I mentioned in my post Your Brain on XML, knowing, in advance, if you are going to be reusing content as part of your ecosystem really helps dictate the way […]

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Content Development · November 29, 2010

Your Brain on XML

Before I move ahead with the rest of the content ecosystem, I want to spend a bit of time talking more about organizing content for XML. Many of Content Rules’s customers are either converting to an XML authoring environment or using XML already. As anyone in this situation knows, the entire approach to organizing content […]

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Content Development · November 21, 2010

The Content Ecosystem

I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about the content ecosystem lately. I’ve been considering the entire end-to-end process of organizing, creating, managing, and publishing content for the global marketplace. Here is a definition of the term ecosystem from WordNet at Princeton University: A system formed by the interaction of a community of organisms […]

Short and Sweet

Fact: Long sentences can be difficult to read. Fact: Long sentences can be difficult to translate. One of the ways to help improve readability of your content in any language is to keep your sentences as short as possible. Let’s look at a real-life example: Rather than spending millions of dollars and months of work […]

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Global Readiness · August 5, 2010

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